On the Lichtenbaum-Quillen Conjectures

Abstract

Starting with some motivations and brief expositions on algebraic K theory, I’ll introduce some early important computations of algebraic K-theory, including computations of K theory of finite fields and of rings of integers for which I will briefly outline the proofs. Then we’ll move on to K-theory with finite coefficients of separably closed fields. With the motivation of recovering some information of K-theory of an arbitrary field from its separable closure, we introduce a few versions of the Lichtenbaum-Quillen conjectures as descent spectral sequences of \’etale Cohomology groups. If time permits, I’ll mention relation to motivic Cohomology that a key tool is some “motivic-to-K-theory” spectral sequence.

These are notes based on my talk on Oct 01, 2021 in UIUC Graduate Homotopy Seminar. The main references are [1] and [2]. The outline of the proof of Quillen’s K-theory of finite fields has been moved to Appendix A.

Here are the notes:

References

[1] Mitchell, Stephen A. “On the Lichtenbaum-Quillen conjectures from a stable homotopy-theoretic viewpoint.” Algebraic topology and its applications. Springer, New York, NY, 1994. 163-240.

[2] Weibel, Charles A. The K-book: An introduction to algebraic K-theory. Vol. 145. Providence, RI: American Mathematical Society, 2013.

A Summary of Quillen’s K-theory of Finite Fields

Abstract

This is an outline of Quillen’s proof for the calculation of K-theory of finite fields, originally done by Quillen in [1], see also [2] for a slightly different presentations with more background materials included.

Here are the full post:

References

[1] Quillen, Daniel. “On the cohomology and K-theory of the general linear groups over a finite field.” Annals of Mathematics 96.3 (1972): 552-586.

[2] Mitchell, S. Notes on K theory of nite elds. Available online:
https://sites.math.northwestern.edu/ jnkf/Mitchell-niteeldsKtheory.pdf

K theory of finite fields (mod l homology)

Recently I have been reading about K theory of finite fields. Here I write some summaries about this calculation and calculate the homology ring of F\psi ^q which is one step in the computation of finite fields, see section 4, {Mitchell}. This post may be continued.

This post has been continued on A Summary of Quillen’s K-theory of Finite Fields (Oct 16, 2021).

The “Dunce Cap” Space Is Contractible

Here is the exercise 6 on P. 50 in the book Topology and Geometry by Glen Bredon. I put it here because I found the drawing of this cap very lovely. Indeed I like that most of the pictures in this book are lovely sketches.

Question. The “dunce cap” space is the quotient of a triangle (and interior) obtained by identifying all three edges in an inconsistent manner. That is, if the vertices of the triangle are p, q, r then we identify the line segment (p, q) with (q, r) and with (p, r) in the
orientation indicated by the order given of the vertices. (See Figure 1-6.) Show that
the dunce cap is contractible.the dunce cap

Following the development in the book, I will use the following theorem that the homotopy type of a mapping cylinder or cone
depends only on the homotopy class of the map [Theorem 14.18, Topology and Geometry by Glen Bredon]. The idea is to identify the dunce cap as a mapping cone.

Theorem 14.18. If f_0\simeq f_1:X\to Y \text{ then } M_{f_0 } \simeq M_{f_1}\text { rel } X+Y \text{ and }C_{f_0}\simeq C_{f_1}\text{ rel } Y+\mathrm{vertex}.

Proof of the Qustion. Suppose f: S^1\to S^1 is a map from S^1 to itself. The cone C_f=M_f/S^1 \times\{1\} for f is obtained by pinching the top of the mapping cylinder to a point. As M_f  is the cylinder S_1\times [0,1] with the bottom pasted to S_1 by the map f, C_f is D_2 with \partial D_2 pasted to S_1 by the map f. So the dunce cap is just C_f \text{ with } f: S^1\to S^1 defined as

f(e^{2\pi i t})= \begin{cases} e^{2\pi i (3t)}, 0\leq t\leq 2/3\\ e^{2\pi i(2- 3t)}, 2/3\leq t\leq 1. \end{cases}

which is homotopic to the identity by a linear homotopy (note that we make the choice of f for an easy definition of the homotopy)

H(e^{2\pi i t},s)= \begin{cases} e^{2\pi i (3t(1-s)+st}, 0\leq t\leq 2/3\\ e^{2\pi i[(2- 3t)(1-s)+st]}, 2/3\leq t\leq 1. \end{cases}.

So the dunce cap is homotopic to C_{id}\simeq D^2 which is contractible.